Fun facts about Tecumseh, Michigan - Toledo News Now, Breaking News, Weather, Sports, Toledo

Fun facts about Tecumseh, Michigan

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(WTOL) - News 11 at 5 and 6 will be broadcast LIVE from Techumseh, Michigan on Friday before the town's big holiday parade. Be sure to come out and join us. We'd love to see you!

 

Fun Facts About Tecumseh

  • Tecumseh recently debuted at #93 on CNN Money Magazine's List of Top 100 Best Places to Live.
  • Tecumseh is the burial site of General Custer's horse, Don Juan.  In his will, the General bequeathed his horse to a friend that resided in Tecumseh.
  • Tecumseh was named for the Shawnee Indian leader who had died only a dozen years before in the War of 1812.
  • Tecumseh's 1st Annual Ice Sculpture Festival will be held January 23rd - 24th, 2010 in Downtown.  The weekend will include ice carving demonstrations, interactive ice sculptures, a chili cook-off, snowman making displays, sales, activities for families and much more!
  • In addition to the Christmas Parade, this is an active weekend.  The Promenade Tecumseh Candlelight Home Tour takes place on Friday and Saturday nights from 5:30 until 8 p.m.  Activities include tours of holiday decorated homes and a church, caroling, refreshments, door prices and activities at the Tecumseh Historical Museum.  There is also a Cookie Walk at the First Presbyterian Church in Downtown Tecumseh.
  • Tecumseh was one of the first three settlements in the Michigan Territory.
  • Tecumseh was the first settlement in Lenawee County, made on May 21, 1824.
  • Tecumseh has park and open space totaling 305 + acres.
  • Tecumseh has an extensive network of pedestrian pathways and hiking/biking trails that provide residents and visitors ample access to 13 parks that virtually surround the City.
  • The population of Tecumseh is approximately 9,000 residents.
  • Tecumseh has two districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  One is comprised of residential homes and the other is located within the Central Business District.
  • Tecumseh is home to the Hayden-Ford Mill, which is now used as the Tecumseh Community and Senior Center.  Located on East Chicago Boulevard (M-50), it was first built as a flour mill in 1835 by George Blanchard, a Tecumseh business man.  It was one of three mills utilizing water power from the River Raisin.  Known as the Globe Mill, it was purchased by William Hayden in 1858 and was rebuilt by Hayden's son Levi after it burned down in 1898.  Henry Ford purchased the mill in the 1930s.  Henry Ford used the mill to process soy beans he grew on farms in the Macon-Tecumseh area for the manufacturing of plastics and paints.  During the war, the mill was used to make parts for the B-24.
  • Tecumseh's Girls' Bowling Team has been State Champions for two years running, in 2008 and 2009!
  • Tecumseh is home to one of Michigan's premier drop-zones - Skydive Tecumseh! They offer Michigan's largest, fastest jump plane with highly experienced instructors for those looking to jump out of a perfectly good airplane!
  • Tecumseh was founded in 1824 by Musgrove Evans and General Joseph Brown. Mr. Evans was a surveying military roads. General Brown was sent by territorial Governor Mason to arrest the surveys who were resurveying the Ohio/Michigan line. General Brown brought his prisoners back to the Tecumseh jail which was the county seat at the time.
  • During the Civil War many of Tecumseh's residents eagerly hid runaway slaves as part of the Underground Railroad.  Legends persist about tunnels and hidden doors and passages in many of the older homes.
  • In the 1930's Ray Herrick founded Tecumseh Products which manufactured refrigeration compressors, giving Tecumseh the title of "Refrigeration Capitol of the World." Tecumseh Products was heavily involved in the war effort and received numerous "E" flags to honor their contribution.
  • A local mill owner, Perry Hayden, started the world famous tithing project "Dynamic Kernels Project" which Henry Ford took a keen interest in and was very involved in the project until his death.