WTOL INVESTIGATES: A Lesson in Strength - Toledo News Now, Breaking News, Weather, Sports, Toledo

WTOL INVESTIGATES: A Lesson in Strength

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Jeremy has a long road of recovery ahead of him, and it will be costly. A fundraiser has been set up for Wednesday, Nov. 24 at Tam O Shanter for 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. Jeremy has a long road of recovery ahead of him, and it will be costly. A fundraiser has been set up for Wednesday, Nov. 24 at Tam O Shanter for 7 p.m. Tickets are $10.

By Chrys Peterson - email

SYLVANIA, OH (WTOL) – Life-changing moments can come for us at any time, and Jeremy Bigelow has had one of the biggest  imaginable.

He was driving on a dark country road in October and lost control of his vehicle. Four others walked away from the crash, but Jeremy couldn't move. The young man known for his enthusiasm and kindness to others is now learning and teaching others a lesson in strength.

What Jeremy is dealing with now is a catastrophic injury. The car accident left him paralyzed from the neck down. The young man who used to snowboard and run marathons is now learning how to breathe on his own again and hoping to regain some movement in his arms and legs. 

"I've always had the mindset of ‘Live it up every day. Live it to the fullest. Have fun. Take every day for what it's worth,'" Jeremy said.

He goes on to say, "Random things do happen, unfortunately. Luckily I've had the right mindset even before the accident happened, so it has kind of prepared me for what I'm  dealing with now."

Jeremy's father is one of his biggest supporters. "He's made us so proud on how many people he's touched, said his dad, Brad Bigelow. "He has that charisma about him. He's just such a likable guy."

Sylvania sports fans and Northview High School students remember Jeremy as a standout football player for the Wildcats in the early 2000s.

Longtime hockey coach Jim Cooper says Jeremy didn't get a lot of time on the ice but was an important member of the team. "Biggie was every bit as important on that team as any of the other players just because he was so full of heart, full of enthusiasm for his teammates. If you needed someone to go throw a heavy check, Biggie was your man."

After college, Jeremy's enthusiasm led him to become a hockey coach himself for a junior high team near Columbus.  

Now, Jeremy says he's in a slow and steady pace to get better with the support of family and friends. "You're not going to be able to run a marathon when you go out on your first run.  You've got to put in the time and the effort."

He also says he's willing to go the extra mile to get better. Jeremy wears a braclet with the number 212. He explains water is liquid at 212 degrees, but with one more degree, that one extra push, it changes to another form. That extra push turns it into a gas.

Jeremy has a long road of recovery ahead of him, and it will be costly. A fundraiser has been set up for Wednesday, Nov. 24 at Tam O Shanter for 7 p.m. Tickets are $10.

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