UTMC breaks ground on 6,000 sq. ft. Parkinson's center - Toledo News Now, Breaking News, Weather, Sports, Toledo

UTMC breaks ground on 6,000 sq. ft. Parkinson's center

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An artist's rendering of the Gardner/McMaster Parkinson's Center. An artist's rendering of the Gardner/McMaster Parkinson's Center.

TOLEDO, OH (Toledo News Now) - The University of Toledo Medical Center broke ground Tuesday on a six-month renovation project to create an advanced center for treating Parkinson's Disease.

The center will be 6,000 square feet and named the Gardner/McMaster Parkinson's Center, according to a news release. The name recognizes donations from the family of Findlay businessman Philip Gardner, as well as the Harold and Helen McMaster Foundation.

The center will increase accessibility for patients and their families, plus put them closer to physical and occupational therapists, as well as speech and language pathologists.

Doctors at UT say it is a dream come true.

"It's like catching the leprechaun, literally, having the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow and have it in our grasp because basically, this center represents a dream come true and of course, all of us dream about catching the leprechaun at the end of the rainbow," said Dr. Lawrence Elmer, professor of neurology and medical director of the Center for Neurological Health at UT.

The ground breaking took place at 10 a.m. on the first floor of Dowling Hall's southwest corner.

The center is expected to open in early 2013 and become one of the country's leading Parkinson's centers.

 


Neurologist Dr. Lawrence Elmer discusses the center and Parkinson's research

 "There have been tremendous advances in the past 10 years that have greatly expanded our understanding of Parkinson's disease and the ways we care for people with this disease," said Elmer.

"This new center will increase accessibility for patients, optimize and maximize the care provided to our patients and their families, and place them in close proximity to physical and occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, and other health-care professionals who are also experts in Parkinson's care," said Elmer, a specialist in the treatment and research of Parkinson's disease for more than 20 years.

"One of the keys we have learned over the years is the value of exercise in slowing the progression of Parkinson's and the importance of a team-care approach in combating complications of the disease."

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