Monroe, MI remembers War of 1812 River Raisin battle - Toledo News Now, Breaking News, Weather, Sports, Toledo

River Raisin battle remembered 200 years later

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MONROE, MI (Toledo News Now) -

The Battle of the River Raisin in Monroe was the largest battle ever fought on Michigan soil.

 

It resulted in the largest number of deaths of any single clash during the War of 1812.

More than 600 Americans were killed by British and Canadian troops and Indians. 

Sixty were seriously injured and more that 500 taken hostage. 

One account by a Kentucky Militiaman named William Atherton described the bloody massacre. 

"The hardship leading up to it was extreme. They were underfed, poorly clothed. When they finally got into battle, they were outnumbered," said Ahterton historian Jon Buller.

What happened 200 years ago this week served as a rallying cry for America, "Remember the Raisin."

"It solidified America's resolve to hold onto the Northwest Territory. America eventually counter-attacked, moved the British out of Michigan, which they conquered at that time and brought the war to a conclusion by invading Canada," said Daniel Downing of the River Raisin National Battlefield Park.

Ninety percent of the casualties along the River Raisin were Kentucky Militiamen.

An emotional ceremony honored their sacrifice and memory.

It was held at the Kentucky Soldiers Monument in downtown Monroe.

Some of the lost militiamen are also buried here.

A bagpipe band played and wreathes were laid at the monument.

Above it all, a Kentucky flag flies beneath an American one.

"We should always remember the Kentucky soldiers and always remember the River Raisin. Many people perished here. As some say, our second independence," said Monroe Mayor Robert Clark.

The River Raisin Battlefield is now a National Park.

There's also a visitors center to visit.

Two hundred years later, people still come here to 'Remember the Raisin.'

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The Battle of the River Raisin in Monroe was the largest battle ever fought on Michigan soil.

 

It resulted in the largest number of deaths of any single clash during the War of 1812.

 

More than 600 Americans were killed by British and Canadian troops and Indians.

 

Sixty were seriously injured and more that 500 taken hostage.

 

One account by a Kentucky Militiaman named William Atherton described the bloody massacre.

 

"The hardship leading up to it was extreme. They were underfed, poorly clothed. When they finally got into battle, they were outnumbered," said Ahterton historian Jon Buller.

 

What happened 200 years ago this week served as a rallying cry for America, "Remember the Raisin."

 

"It solidified America's resolve to hold onto the Northwest Territory. America eventually counter-attacked, moved the British out of Michigan, which they conquered at that time and brought the war to a conclusion by invading Canada," said Daniel Downing of the River Raisin National Battlefield Park.

 

Ninety percent of the casualties along the River Raisin were Kentucky Militiamen.

 

An emotional ceremony honored their sacrifice and memory.

 

It was held at the Kentucky Soldiers Monument in downtown Monroe.

 

Some of the lost militiamen are also buried here.

 

A bagpipe band played and wreathes were laid at the monument.

 

Above it all, a Kentucky flag flies beneath an American one.

 

"We should always remember the Kentucky soldiers and always remember the River Raisin. Many people perished here. As some say, our second independence," said Monroe Mayor Robert Clark.

 

The River Raisin Battlefield is now a National Park.

 

There's also a visitors center to visit.

Two hundred years later, people still come here to 'Remember the Raisin.'

The Battle of the River Raisin in Monroe was the largest battle ever fought on Michigan soil.

 

It resulted in the largest number of deaths of any single clash during the War of 1812.

 

More than 600 Americans were killed by British and Canadian troops and Indians.

 

Sixty were seriously injured and more that 500 taken hostage.

 

One account by a Kentucky Militiaman named William Atherton described the bloody massacre.

 

"The hardship leading up to it was extreme. They were underfed, poorly clothed. When they finally got into battle, they were outnumbered," said Ahterton historian Jon Buller.

 

What happened 200 years ago this week served as a rallying cry for America, "Remember the Raisin."

 

"It solidified America's resolve to hold onto the Northwest Territory. America eventually counter-attacked, moved the British out of Michigan, which they conquered at that time and brought the war to a conclusion by invading Canada," said Daniel Downing of the River Raisin National Battlefield Park.

 

Ninety percent of the casualties along the River Raisin were Kentucky Militiamen.

 

An emotional ceremony honored their sacrifice and memory.

 

It was held at the Kentucky Soldiers Monument in downtown Monroe.

 

Some of the lost militiamen are also buried here.

 

A bagpipe band played and wreathes were laid at the monument.

 

Above it all, a Kentucky flag flies beneath an American one.

 

"We should always remember the Kentucky soldiers and always remember the River Raisin. Many people perished here. As some say, our second independence," said Monroe Mayor Robert Clark.

 

The River Raisin Battlefield is now a National Park.

 

There's also a visitors center to visit.

Two hundred years later, people still come here to 'Remember the Raisin.'

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